Inflammatory Disease Modeling

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Inflammation Models

Autoimmune diseases and other inflammatory disorders are mediated by dysfunction of the body’s immune system, typically in the form of hypersensitivity. These disorders are subject to intensive research and drug development efforts, and require extensive study in mouse models of inflammation. Biocytogen provides robust inflammation models, including those designed to experimentally model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), psoriasis, asthma, and other diseases in mice. Novel anti-human inflammatory modulators can also be tested in our humanized cytokine/cytokine receptor mouse models. These mouse models of inflammation allow researchers to evaluate the preclinical efficacy of therapeutics against specific human targets in mice critical to the underlying molecular mechanisms of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

For a full list of our humanized cytokine models, click here.

Watch our recent webinars:

Inflammatory Disease Modeling for Preclinical Studies

Joint, Lung, and Urinary Disease Models Offered at Biocytogen

 

Skin related diseases

Psoriasis: IMQ

Atopic dermatitis: OXA, MC903

Delayed type hypersensitivity: OXA, KLH

Pruritus: Wound healing (in development)

Alopecia Areata: IMQ (in development)

Respiratory system

Acute Lung Injury: ALT, Papain

Asthma: ALT, OVA, HDM

Pulmonary fibrosis: BLM

Digestive system

Ulcerative enteritis: DSS, TNBS

Crohn’s disease: T cell transfer model (in development)

Joint injury

Rheumatoid arthritis: CII, CAIA

Osteoporosis model: OVX

Osteoarthritis model: ACLT

Nervous system

Multiple sclerosis: EAE

Ischemic stroke: MCAO model (in development)

Inflammatory pain: Plantar pain measuring instrument (in development)

Urinary system

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Pristane

Nephritis: POP model (in development)

Chronic kidney disease: Nephrectomy model

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